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There Are Too Many arXiv Papers

Jordan Harrod
Jordan Harrod
3 min read

Happy Saturday!

People often ask me how I keep up with new research related to my work (or my content), especially as my work straddles a few different fields. My answer is usually some combination of Google Scholar alerts, emails from specific journals that I try to keep an eye on, Twitter, and occasionally Meta.org (a Chan-Zuckerberg Institute platform that is shutting down in early 2022, presumably because of the new naming conflict 👀).

You might notice that none of those resources explicitly involve sourcing new pre-prints from arXiv, where machine learning and computer science research is often submitted before publication in a peer-reviewed conference or journal.

And that's because there are too many arXiv papers.

You might think I'm exaggerating, but I used to get a weekly digest of new submissions to specific sub-sections, and there were literally hundreds of articles to parse through in every email. After about a month of recieving these digests, I unsubscribed because going through each email to see if there was anything relevant to my interests took the better part of my Monday mornings.

Source: arXiv.org

Now, this isn't to say that I think the increasing number of submissions is bad - in fact, I think it's actually a positive shift towards a kind of open access peer review that will hopefully improve research overall. And there are tools that you can use to help preserve your sanity (in particular, the aptly named arXiv sanity preserver), but I do often wonder whether I've missed a really interesting niche paper because I couldn't find it in the sea of submissions. I suppose I'll never know. 🤷🏽‍♀️

How do you keep up with research in your field? Do you have a preferred arXiv tool or search filter? Let me know - you can always ping me on Twitter or shoot me an email.

P.S. - Unrelated to the above, the #TeamSeas campaign to raise $30M to remove 30M pounds of plastic and trash waste launched yesterday afternoon! (which is also why this newsletter is late - oops) If you're interested in learning more or  donating, you can head over to https://teamseas.org, or you can check out this week's video down below.


☀️ This Week's Snippets

📖 Reading: 1001 Voices on Climate Change by Devi Lockwood (💲) - I met Devi on an MIT Museum-led trip to London a few years ago, and will never forget my amazement at learning about her solo travels around the world (on a bike!) looking for stories about climate change. She recently published a book recounting these stories, and I've been slowly making my way through them.

💻 Using: Freewrite Traveler -  I'll start by saying that this is a totally unnecessary product for the vast majority of people. 😅 Having said that, I often struggle to write on my laptop because I end up getting distracted by notifications or other random tasks that pop into my head. I came across the Freewrite Traveler, marketed as a "distraction-free writing tool" in a WIRED Gear review a few weeks ago, and decided to try it out! So far, it's actually helped me spend more time writing uncritically, although the keyboard can be a little wonky.

🧠 Quote of the Week:


➡️ This Week in Content


Have a great weekend!

-J